Wednesday, 27 March 2013 14:45

April Lunchtime at the Library book reviews begin Tuesday

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     The Oswego Public Library invites the community to the Lunchtime at the Library book reviews in April.

     Held at noon each Tuesday in April in the library's Community Room, book lovers can enjoy professional review of the following interesting titles while the Friends of the Library's provide great refreshments.

April 2, 12 p.m. – Mindy Ostrow reviews "The Art Forger" by B.A. Shapiro
   The Art Forger  In the early morning hours of March 18, 1990, two men dressed as police officers bound and gagged two guards at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Mass., and stole 13 works of art worth today more than $500 million. Despite thousands of hours of police work and a $5 million reward, the artwork has never been recovered. Claire Roth, a struggling young artist, is about to discover that there is more to this crime than meets the eye.
     After a scandal involving the provenance of an acclaimed modern painting derails Claire Roth's career, the promising young Boston artist, now a pariah in the art world, makes a living reproducing famous works of art for the popular online retailer, Reproductions.com. In a desperate move to improve her situation, Claire makes a Faustian bargain with Aiden Markel, a powerful gallery owner, to forge a Degas masterpiece stolen during the Gardner Museum heist, the largest unsolved art theft in history, in return for a one-woman show at his gallery. Their romantic entanglement adds danger to their business arrangement and heightens the possibility of betrayal as each struggles to achieve the end that initially drove them into their illegal pact.
     But when the long-missing Degas painting – the one which had been hanging for 100 years at the Gardner Museum – is delivered to Claire's studio, she begins to suspect that it may not be the original, but a forgery itself. As she begins her search for the truth about the painting's origins and its possible link to a secret relationship between Edgar Degas and Isabella Stewart Gardner – revealed to the reader through Isabella's letters to her niece – Claire finds herself in a breathless race through a labyrinth of deceit where secrets hidden since the late 19th century may hold the key to the mysteries of the present. (From the author's website)

 

April 9, 12 p.m. – Bill Reilly reviews the 2013 Oswego Reads selection "City of Thieves" by David Benioff
   City of Thieves During the Nazis' brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful Soviet colonel to use in his daughter's wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and behind enemy lines to find the impossible. (From the author's website)

 

April 16, 12 p.m. – Donna Bradway reviews "Murder at the Library of Congress" by Margaret Truman

     Murder at the Library of CongressIn the depths of the U.S. Library of Congress toil thousands of researchers, chasing down obsessions, breakthroughs, and new contributions to human wisdom. But when amateur D.C. sleuth Annabel Reed-Smith enters this stately American institution, she discovers a hornet's nest of intrigue and murder.
     After a renowned scholar is bludgeoned to death among the scholarly stacks, an ambitious TV reporter links the case to the heist of a Spanish painting from a Miami museum and a killing in Mexico City. Annabel suspects that buried in the Library are secrets some people will do anything to keep silent – the secret of a rich man's ambition, a researcher's disappearance, and a mysterious diary of Christopher Columbus's journey written 500 years ago. (From the author's website)

 

April 23, 12 p.m. – Carolyn Dougherty reviews "Touch" by Alexi Zentner
    Touch In Sawgamet, a north woods boomtown gone bust, the cold of winter breaks the glass of the schoolhouse thermometer, and the dangers of working in the cuts are overshadowed by the mysteries and magic lurking in the woods. Stephen, a pastor, is at home on the eve of his mother's funeral, thirty years after the mythic summer his grandfather returned to the town in search of his beloved but long-dead wife. And like his grandfather, Stephen is forced to confront the losses of his past.
     Touch introduces you to a world where monsters and witches oppose singing dogs and golden caribou, where the living and the dead part and meet again in the crippling beauty of winter and the surreal haze of summer. (From the author's website)

 

April 30, 12 p.m. – Theresa Slosek reviews "Unbroken" by Laura Hillenbrand

     UnbrokenOn a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane's bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.
     The lieutenant's name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he'd been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.
     Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will. (From the author's website)

      The Oswego Public Library is at 120 E. Second St., in view of the Oswego River and Canal. The library is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Thursday; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday; and from 12-5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday.

     For more information, call 315-341-5867.

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